Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner.  
Commissioner's Office: 01707 806100
New Special Constables join Hertfordshire Constabulary
Thirteen new Special Constables were warmly welcomed into Hertfordshire Constabulary during their Attestation Ceremony at Police Headquarters on Thursday (March 14).
 
Special Constables have full police powers, uniform and protective equipment and work alongside the regular force.
 
During eleven weeks of training, the new recruits learnt about basic law around theft, public order, assaults, traffic, powers of arrest and Stop and Search. They also used a virtual learning environment which trained them in legislation.
 
Each graduate went through a rigorous selection process and had to pass a final exam and practical assessments to enable them to qualify for the role of Special Constable.
 

Those who graduated are:
 
Broxbourne
  • Joseph O’Grady who volunteers at a charity.
 North Herts
  • Luke Balazy who works as an apprentice mechanical and electrical engineer.
  • Jack Nicol who works as a technical sales engineer.
 St Albans
  • Thomas Martin
 Stevenage
  • Hannah Draycott who works for an airline company.
 Watford
  • Christopher Larner who works as a telecoms engineer.
  • Paul Ferebee who works for a motor company.
  • Jamie Quinn who works at a trampolining company.
 Welwyn Hatfield
  • Michael Avery who works as a business analyst for an asset management company.
  • Robert Pitts who works as a paraplanning manager in the City.
  • Ellis Herbert who works in the Constabulary’s Force Communications Room (FCR) as a Communications Operator.
  • Christian Kirk who works for the ambulance service and is studying for his paramedic degree.
  • Samuel Moorby who works part time at an end of life care home.
 They were joined on the evening by family, friends and local dignitaries.
 
Over the next 12 months, the new recruits will continue their training, allowing them to pass out as substantive Special Constables once they are assessed as fit for independent patrol.
 
Assistant Chief Constable Nathan Briant awarded the Specials with their certificates. He said: “It is a great honour to welcome these new Special Constables to the Constabulary. The work they do is vital in helping us to police the county. I want to wish them all well as they now move on to undertake this important role within the communities of Hertfordshire.”
 
Special Constabulary Chief Officer, Mark Kendrew said: “I was delighted to meet our new Special Constables and I am very proud to welcome them to our dedicated team. They have been through a rigorous recruitment process and spent a number of weeks completing the intensive training required to fulfil the role of a Special Constable.
 
“Becoming a Special Constable brings with it the promise of being involved in something exciting, worthwhile and that makes a real difference in the local community as well as having the chance to learn new skills. I have no doubt they will make a significant contribution to policing in Hertfordshire.”
 
Kevin McGetrick, Head of Victims Services at Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner's office said: ““As these new recruits embark on their journey with the Special Constabulary it was particularly pleasing to see the depth of support to wish them well, not only from friends and family but civic dignitaries and local councillors.

"This demonstrates the admiration of people in Hertfordshire for those individuals who have volunteered to help keep our communities safe”
 
A short film has recently been launched to showcase the exciting role of a Special Constable in the hope it will encourage more people to volunteer with Hertfordshire’s Special Constabulary. You can view the video on the Herts Police YouTube channel at youtube.com/hertspolice
 
Recruitment of Special Constables
Hertfordshire Constabulary is actively recruiting Special Constables. It is looking for motivated team players wanting a challenge.  Special Constables have full police powers, uniform and protective equipment and work alongside the regular force.
 
Special Constables get involved in all areas of frontline policing - from high visibility patrols around pubs and clubs at the weekend and being called to assist at the scene of a road traffic collision or burglary to arresting offenders or reassuring and advising residents after a crime has occurred. Hertfordshire Constabulary are piloting ‘Career Pathways’ and have a number of specialist opportunities for officers.
 
Once initial training is complete, Specials are posted to local response or neighbourhood teams and are coached by regular officers to complete their Police Action Checklists and are then deemed fit for independent patrol.  On average this can take around 12 months. Once the officers are fit for independent patrol, they can apply for a posting to one of our specialist teams.
 
Aside from ‘response’ or local Safer Neighbourhood policing, there are constantly evolving opportunities to work within specialist policing environments, such as the investigation of modern slavery, human trafficking, cybercrime, domestic abuse, proactive units targeting local drug dealers, wanted persons, night time economy issues and prisoner processing.
 
Those with an interest or expertise in countryside and rural issues can become Rural Special Constables who are dedicated to the needs of rural communities. They work alongside our Rural Operation Support Team (ROST) and local police Safer Neighbourhood Teams investigating heritage crime or wildlife offences, tackling hare coursing or poaching, to dealing with fly-tipping or crop damage.
 
If you would like more information on becoming a Special Constable, visit www.hertspolicespecials.co.uk and click on ‘register your interest’ to receive an application form (please check your junk folder!) or browse the pages to find out more. You can also view our new video and read case studies from some of our officers who feature.
 
  • An information evening will be held at Police Headquarters on Wednesday, March 27 (7pm) for people to find out more about joining the Special Constabulary. If you wish to attend, please email specialsrecruitment@herts.pnn.police.uk

 
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Commissioner welcomes 29 new officers to Hertfordshire Constabulary

A graduation ceremony welcomed 29 new police officers into Hertfordshire Constabulary last week (Friday, March 15).

The new constables passed out after completing a 16 week training course and will now be deployed across the county.

During the ceremony, which took place at Longfield Training Development Centre in Stevenage, they paraded in front of Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd and Chief Constable Charlie Hall.
 
The latest recruits follow 32 other graduates who joined Hertfordshire police two months ago. Earlier this year Mr Lloyd promised to put 75 more police officers on the streets by using the money from the Council Tax precept, which increased by an average of £2 a month.


Addressing the new officers Mr Lloyd said: “You have exciting careers ahead of you. It is one of the most rewarding jobs you can do, but it can be difficult too and we recognise the sacrifice you are making.
 
“You are a police officer all of the time, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 52 weeks a year. When you put the uniform on people will be drawn to you in their time of need. It will be a privilege and a challenge.
 
“Every day I know you will strive to uphold the exemplary standards expected from Hertfordshire Constabulary.”
 
Chief Constable for Hertfordshire, Charlie Hall said: “Nothing gives me greater pleasure than welcoming more officers in to the Constabulary.
 
“There is plenty of work for you to do out there and you will thoroughly enjoy it. You will have some wonderful opportunities available, if you chose to specialise it could be in departments including the traffic, dogs or firearms.

“Many of you want to be detectives, this is the second graduation we have had which includes entrants through our graduate accelerated detective scheme. The nature of crime is changing and we need people to undertake complex investigations.”
 

The training included a mixture of classroom based and practical sessions, covering a vast range of topics including law and powers, personal safety and dealing with volatile situations, first aid and safeguarding vulnerable victims.

Below is the number of officers that will deployed in the following districts -
Stevenage – 2
Watford – 4
Hertsmere – 4
North Herts – 4
Dacorum – 7
Broxbourne – 3
Welwyn Hatfield – 3
St Albans – 3
 

BACKGROUND:
Have you considered whether representing your community as a police officer is for you? The Constabulary offers career progression, personal development and a welcoming, supportive workplace to people with different life experiences and backgrounds.
You can register your interest or submit your application at www.hertspolicecareers.co.uk.
For more information please contact:
Nigel Atkins Senior Communications Officer, Hertfordshire PCC on 01707 806163 or email nigel.atkins@herts.pcc.pnn.gov.uk
Hertfordshire is a safe place to live and work but should you ever become a victim of crime then the Beacon team is available to help you. www.hertfordshirebeacon.org
 
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Cash help for fly tipped victims paid for by criminals
Victims of fly tipping including farmers and landowners can apply for cash grants to clear up the rubbish left behind.
A pilot scheme by David Lloyd, the Police and Crime Commissioner for Hertfordshire, is being expanded to help those whose green and open spaces have been contaminated.
Using £20,000 generated by the Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) businesses in four local authority areas across the county will be able to apply for financial aid to assist with clean-up operations.
St Albans and Welwyn Hatfield district councils are now joining the scheme alongside existing members Broxbourne and Three Rivers.

Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd said:
“Fly tipping is a serious crime and it has a significant impact on our community. It blights the countryside and causes substantial costs for farmers and landowners to clear the waste and poses a danger to livestock and wildlife.
“I do not believe it is fair that farmers and landowners are left to pick up a bill, which can run in to thousands of pounds, because someone else has fly tipped on their property.
“Our relentless drive to support bringing offenders to justice by funding enforcement measures, making improvements to security and educating the public on responsible waste disposal, saw a 17.9 per cent drop in fly tipping across Hertfordshire
“This pilot allows funds from the proceeds of crime to be used for positive effect to remove fly tipping, target known hot-spots and advise landowners and farmers on improving security.
“As part of my Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan I pledged to investigate the potential of using money recovered from criminals to be put to good use in this way.

Duncan Jones, Partnership Development Manager and Chairman of the Hertfordshire Fly Tipping Group
, said: “This latest initiative is another good example of how the relevant Hertfordshire agencies such as local authorities and the Office of the Police & Crime Commissioner are working together to deliver new initiatives to tackle fly tipping.”
To be eligible for the funding farmers or green space landowners will have to prove they already have a waste disposal contract in place with an authorised collection firm.
The scheme is part of the county wide multi-agency and multi- channel campaign being run by the Herts Fly Tipping Group - #SCRAPflytipping.
Anyone interested in making a claim or finding out more information can contact the Environmental team at one of the four district councils and mention the Police and Crime Commissioner’s private land fly tipping pilot.
For St Albans District contact David Webb on 01727 809 019 and for Welwyn Hatfield contact Christiana Akinbogun 01707 357 000.
The CLA (Country Land and Business Association) represents farmers, landowners and rural businesses across Hertfordshire. CLA East Regional Director Ben Underwood said: “With almost two-thirds of farmers and landowners affected by fly-tipping each year, with some targeted multiple times each month, we need to take stronger action against this serious crime.
“As it stands currently, landowners affected by a fly-tipping incident can be subject to prosecution if they do not remove the waste from their land. It can cost them more than £800 on average to clear each incident so this pilot in Hertfordshire is extremely encouraging and we hope it is successful.”
NFU Hertfordshire County Adviser Rosalind David said: “Fly tipping is criminal. It is harming Hertfordshire’s beautiful countryside, posing a danger to wildlife and livestock and costing farmers and landowners time and money to clear away. We welcome the extension of this initiative and look forward to continuing to work in partnership to tackle fly tipping within the county.”

BACKGROUND:
Land covered by the fund, includes; privately owned woodland and forestry land, land that was formerly used for agriculture parking, land used for horticultural purposes and tree nurseries.
Over the last two years the PCC has committed over £130,000 through his Local Partnership Fund to help local authorities tackle fly tipping on public land across Hertfordshire.
The Hertfordshire Fly Tipping Group is a multi-agency taskforce including the Boroughs, Districts and County Council as well as the Police, Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner, Herts Fire & Rescue, the Environment Agency, the National Farmers Union and Keep Britain Tidy which has come together to improve how Hertfordshire responds to fly tipping. The on-going work programme is resulting in improvements in enforcement capability across the county as well as the rollout of new technology to assist in identifying and prosecuting fly tippers. www.hertfordshire.gov.uk/flytipping
The work of the group was also praised by the Environment Minister Therese Coffey.
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Commissioner approves large county-wide initiative to tackle knife and serious violent crime
A major new initiative to tackle knife and serious violent crime across the county is to be funded by Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd.
The £280,000 scheme aims to safeguard 200 children and young adults in Hertfordshire who are at risk of being drawn into gang activity and other serious offending.
This week Mr Lloyd approved a £140,000 Community Safety Grant from his office which will be matched by Hertfordshire County Council and District councils.
The money will be used to recruit additional SOS St Giles’ Trust youth project workers over the next year who will focus on early intervention and targeted help for young people at risk.
Mr Lloyd said: “Hertfordshire remains a low crime area with much less knife and serious crime than many parts of the country. But we are not immune from national trends and in Hertfordshire we have criminals travelling in from London and across county lines.
“Understandably this is a key public concern that I share, and I am committed to making a real difference and combating it.
“I have agreed this substantial funding as we need to prevent these vulnerable children and young people being forced in to crime.

“The grant will enable Crime Panels to be set up across the county involving the police, schools, councils and children services to identify those at risk.
“Last year I funded a successful pilot of this scheme in Broxbourne and now is the right time to expand their work out across Hertfordshire.”
Broxbourne Safer Neighbourhood Team Inspector Roy Stammers said: “Unfortunately, nationally we have seen an increase in knife crime and Hertfordshire has also been affected by this.
“It’s now more important than ever that we work together with our partners and the community to help safeguard some of the most vulnerable in our society – our children.
“With this increase in knife carrying and gang-related activity, our collective efforts in identifying and targeting risk is essential.
“The St Giles Trust works closely with us, a number of our local schools, other partners and members of the community to help show the realities and risks of being in a gang through their SOS+ Project.

“As well as delivering assemblies around topics such as gangs, county lines and child sexual exploitation, their case workers – who are former gang members – work closely with students who might be at risk of becoming involved with gangs or of placing themselves at other risk.
“By being able to engage and build an initial rapport with younger people, alongside schools, the trust can help deter them from a falsely glamorised lifestyle and offer them support and advice, which enables them to envision a better future by becoming contributory members of society.”
As part of the scheme local schools will be offered the opportunity to refer high risk young people in to an intensive support service to disrupt and divert them away from crime and joining gangs.
St Giles Trust is a charity helping people to change their lives through support and guidance. The aim to help them become positive contributors to local communities.
Police officers and council’s across Hertfordshire will engage with the project through their Community Safety Partnerships to identify and assist those needing safeguarding.

Youth Offending Teams in the Hertfordshire have identified where offences are categorised as “serious violent crime” knife possession is the most common offence. The most common age of offending is for age 15-16.
Andy Stovold, Head of Community Partnerships at Three Rivers Council, who led the bid said: “The ten community safety partnerships across Hertfordshire along with the Children’s Safegurding Partnership, Adult Safeguarding Board and Public Health are collaborating to ensure there is a robust response to the risks of young people being involved in serious violence and criminal exploitation.
“Many of the District and Borough based Community Safety Partnership are identifying young people at risk of violent crime and exploitation and additional funding from the PCC will assist the local partnership in protecting those young people from further harm.
“By developing a co-ordinated response we will be identifying young people at risk and ensuring they and their families are supported to address their risk taking behaviour.”

BACKGROUND:
Last year Broxbourne Community Safety Partnership was awarded a grant of £256,975, spread over three years, in one of the largest awards ever provided by the Commissioner.
The Police and Crime Commissioner oversees a Community Safety Grant which supports work with partner organisations (such as community safety partnerships) that have a vital part to play in keeping Hertfordshire’s communities safe.
Grant applicants are asked to consider how their proposed projects align with the aims of the Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan, as well as with local priorities.
The Commissioner attaches conditions to the grant, which help him oversee how well the money is spent on behalf of local communities and to ensure that there is transparency and accountability. Annual reports are requested which provide information on progress and evidence of effectiveness.
Grant recipients need to make sure their activities focus on the needs of the public, particularly victims of crime, ensuring that offenders make amends and pay back for the cost of crime, including setting out plans to apply greater business sense. In delivering against the Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan, the Commissioner envisages that these grants will contribute towards securing crime and disorder reduction in Hertfordshire.
 
Click the link here to see how the grants were allocated from this fund for the 2018/19 financial year.
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Mini Police, tractors to fight crime and policing major towns in East Herts at the weekends

Mini Police, tractors to fight crime and policing major towns in East Herts at the weekends were all covered in the Police and Crime Commissioner’s latest District Day.

David Lloyd also saw first-hand two fly tipping sites where sixty tonnes of rubbish were dumped in Barwick and Much Hadham.
Every year Mr Lloyd is committed to visiting each of the county’s ten districts at least once to speak to police officers, residents and groups, to understand the local issues and find solutions.
“It has been an extremely informative day and one of contrasts. East Herts is the biggest single district in the county which brings challenges in terms of rural crime, as well as that associated with the busy night time economies of Hertford and Bishop’s Stortford.
“I have seen the great work which is being done in the schools, had a very informative update from the Chief Inspector and witnessed the scourge of fly tipping.”

Mr Lloyd spent an hour at Hillmead Primary School, in Woburn Avenue, Bishop’s Stortford, answering dozens of questions from a class of Year 5 pupils.
Among the queries they had were: Have you ever shot anyone? How fast can police cars go on a blue light? Do you like your job? How many people are arrested every day? Who is the oldest police officer? and Have you seen the grey lady police station ghost?
In reply to being asked what is the most common crime in Hertfordshire Mr Lloyd told them: “That is one that you have to keep a look out for every day – it is cyber-crime. It involves cyber bulling online and also fraud where people try to steal your money.”

The pupils, aged 9 and 10, are taking part in Hertfordshire’s Mini Police scheme which engages them with officers, breaks down perceived barriers and teaches them about policing. They also learn about Stranger Danger and how to stay safe online in the eight week course.
The Commissioner also went to Foxholes Farm, in London Road, Hertford, to speak to local officers and farmer Tom Parkins, who volunteers to help support the police.
Mr Lloyd was shown one of the 30 dash cameras his office has provided for farmers to put in their vehicles, including tractors and all-terrain vehicles. One is also in a milk float.
They enable the drivers to report anything suspicious they see with video footage, and it also allows officers investigating crimes to visit them to see if they caught anything on camera around the time of the offence.

Sgt Duncan Wallace said: “They have been a great tool to give out to farmers as it gives us an extra pair of eyes in the sparsely populated rural areas. They also make offenders think twice and worry if they have been picked up by the dash cams.”
New initiatives to tackle hare coursing which occurs in the district were also discussed.

At Hertford Police station Mr Lloyd met with Chief Inspector Stuart Orton to discuss existing issues and new threats.
“We do have an issue in Hertford and Bishop’s Stortford with county lines where people are coming out of London to deal drugs. It is a problem, but so far we have not had the violence that can be associated with this activity.
“We have successfully shut down several of the lines recently and are determined to keep coming down hard on the problem.”
Ch Insp Orton also highlighted the new Youth Safety Partnership to engage with children and young adults in conjunction with the District Council,  YC Herts, local schools, Targeted Youth Support Services  and CYP colleagues.
Mr Lloyd also went to the scene of two huge fly tipping incidents in which 60 tonnes of waste was illegally dumped just a few miles apart within a week.

Both piles measuring 6m long by 3m high were made up of processed residential waste which has been sorted then compacted. One was left on farmland in Barwick while the other was left at the entrance to a school playing field in Much Hadham.
After examining the piles Mr Lloyd said: “These are some of the worst fly tipping crimes I have come across anywhere in the county. It is going to cost several thousand pounds to clear up the mess these criminals have left behind.”
At the end of the day he met with Laura Hyde, Chief Executive of East Herts Citizens Advice Bureau, to discuss how they could work together to help residents in remote rural communities.
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Call for tough action after 60 tonnes of processed waste fly tipped
Two huge fly tipping incidents have seen 60 tonnes of waste illegally dumped just a few miles apart within a week.
Both were inspected, one just hours after it happened by David Lloyd, Police and Crime Commissioner for Hertfordshire, as he was touring East Herts as part of his monthly district day visits.
Both piles measuring 6m long by 3m high are made up of processed residential waste which has been sorted then compacted. One was left on farmland in Barwick while the other was left at the entrance to a school playing field in Much Hadham.
After examining the piles Mr Lloyd said: “These are some of the worst fly tipping crimes I have come across anywhere in the county. It is going to cost several thousand pounds to clear up the mess these criminals have left behind.

“The scale and audacity of this crime is shocking, there should be severe penalties for the offenders when they brought to justice.
“Fly tipping is one of those issues that is most frequently raised to me by residents. It is something which blights many communities.
“It has always been and remains one of my priorities as Commissioner to tackle the issue. This is best achieved when all the relevant agencies including the police and district councils work together.”
Refering to the dumping in Gore Lane, Barwick, just beside the A10, local Sgt Duncan Wallace said: “We know this happened between 5am and 5.30am yesterday (Monday) morning but have not yet found any eye witnesses who saw the unloading taking place.
“This was an organised operation involving the dumping of processed waste. To gain access to the site a padlock was cut off a gate with an angle grinder.
“We are working with our partners at the council to investigate the matter.”
 
The other load was dumped on overnight between the 18th and 19th of February at Jobbers Wood, the sports field facility for Bishop’s Stortford High School in Much Hadham.
It has led to the closure of the facility for the children until arrangements can be made for it to be moved.
Graham McAndrew, executive member for waste at East Herts Council said, “Due to the size of the fly tips, we had to report it to the Environment Agency (EA). An East Herts officer will always attend to try and find evidence for prosecution.
We would encourage anyone who may have witnesses an incident like this to come forward with information as this could help us bring the culprit to justice. If you witness a fly tipping incident, you can report it via our website: https://www.eastherts.gov.uk/reportflytip

BACKGROUND:

The Police and Crime Commissioner, Hertfordshire Constabulary, together with Hertfordshire County Council together with the County’s ten District and Borough Councils have agreed to work together to combat the scourge of fly-tipping.
Work has been continuing as part of the Police and Crime Commissioner’s vision outlined in his Police and Crime Plan, Everybody’s Business to respond to concerns raised by the public to address fly-tipping across the county.
Key changes include a single definition of fly tipping, a standardised recording process, easier reporting, a single point of contact in each district, and additional funding to create a countywide approach that tackles the issue more efficiently.
Work to date has seen statutory partner agencies from across all of Hertfordshire’s ten districts and boroughs and the County Council come to an agreement on a countywide definition for fly-tipping which is in line with the National Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) guidelines.
A single countywide definition will assist and support with future strategic planning, enabling a countywide view on evidencing, mapping and analysing the extent of the problem, and for stakeholders to allocate sufficient resources and tackle hot spot areas or persistent offenders
 
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New film launched to encourage more volunteers to join Hertfordshire's Special Constabulary
A short film has been launched to showcase the exciting role of a Special Constable in the hope it will encourage more people to volunteer with Hertfordshire’s Special Constabulary.
 
The Constabulary currently has a 290 strong team of volunteer police officers who play an essential role in preventing, reducing and tackling crime and keeping the communities of Hertfordshire safe.
 
The film features three serving Special Constables and highlights the diversity of roles on offer. This includes working with the Constabulary’s Safer Neighbourhood Teams; responding to 999 emergency calls alongside our ‘Intervention’ teams; and supporting and policing rural communities as a Rural Special Constable.
 
The film will be shared via the Commissioner’s and the Constabulary’s social media channels and is hosted on the dedicated recruitment website – www.hertspolicespecials.co.uk
 
Police and Crime Commissioner for Hertfordshire, David Lloyd said: “Special Constables are an integral part of the wider policing family, playing a vital role in strengthening local policing teams across the county.
“They provide a visible and reassuring presence and are highly valued by the teams they work alongside.  In my Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan I highlight how organisations and businesses can play their part in supporting their staff to become Special Constables as part of Employer Supported Policing.
“A number of businesses are signed up and actively seeing the benefits of supporting their employees by allowing the leave, either paid or unpaid, to carry out their Special Constable duties.” 

Chief Constable Charlie Hall said: “The opportunities open to our Special Constables are diverse and these are just some of the specialist roles we offer. The role of a Special is a volunteer opportunity like no other. You will be working shoulder to shoulder with our regular officers, with the same police powers and uniform, and finding yourself dealing with situations you’ll never be exposed to in your day to day life.
 
“Our Special Constables are rightly proud of the work they do and say they benefit hugely from the skills and experience they gain on their shifts.  And of course the Constabulary, and residents of Hertfordshire, benefit hugely from the life experiences they bring and from the time they give.
 
“To anyone who may interested, I’d say to find out more. It does require a time commitment of 16 hours per month and an intense 12 week training course, but the rewards are endless.”
 
Special Constabulary Chief Officer, Mark Kendrew said:  “In 2018, our Special Constables delivered 71,614 hours of policing, conducted 364 arrests and assisted with a further 602 arrests, and conducted 122 drug seizures and 138 vehicle seizures.
 
“The numbers of officers and the hours they volunteer has increased by 15 per cent in the past year, which bucks the national trend where there has been a significant fall in officers. I’m extremely proud of the team, their dedication to policing and their commitment to keeping our county safe.
 
“It is an incredibly rewarding volunteering opportunity and if you’re interested in joining, we have an excellent recruitment team to guide you through the process.”
 
If you would like more information on becoming a Special Constable, visit www.hertspolicespecials.co.uk and click on ‘apply online’ or browse the pages to find out more.

 
Dan, an ‘Intervention Team’ Special Constable who features in the film and has over five years’ service, said: “To be able to work side by side with the full time officers and feel like you are a part of their team is a great feeling, especially when we are all able to make a difference and have a real impact to local policing.
 
“Policing has allowed me to improve my communication and conflict management skills to name just a couple. These have helped me deal with difficult situations in my full time job, and I’m confident that I would not have been able to handle them anywhere near as well as I did if it had not been for the training and experience I’ve gained whilst being a Special.”
 
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Hertfordshire GPS offender tracking pilot to be rolled out across UK
A more robust and advanced scheme to track offenders by GPS, which was piloted in Hertfordshire, is to be rolled out nationally.

Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd has welcomed the extension of the tagging scheme which uses satellites to pinpoint the location of those on bail or serving community sentences instead of jail.

This morning Mr Lloyd, who is also Chair of Hertfordshire Criminal Justice Board, attended the speech by Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice Dave Gauke MP where the roll-out was announced.

“I am pleased that Hertfordshire has played a key role in this pilot scheme and a major part in proving that it can be a success.
“We have been fully supportive of giving offenders mandatory tags to help relieve pressure on the Criminal Justice System. Our partners were very supportive of the scheme and were keen for it to continue.

“It is not about being soft on criminals, it is about better offering better protection for victims by ensuring closer monitoring of suspects and offenders. Plus reducing the number of victims by reducing reoffending rates.

“I got an assurance from the Minister today that victims’ voices will continue to be heard.”
The Hertfordshire pilot ended in March 2018 after running for 18 months alongside neighbouring forces in Bedfordshire, Northamptonshire and Cambridgeshire.

Those subject to the GPS trackers included those on court bail, Home Office Detention Curfews and community or suspended sentences. Prisoners released on licence or by the parole board were also tagged.

Independent evaluation conducted after the trial found benefits across the Criminal Justice System including those with the tags having better rehabilitation options available and a reduction in reoffending.

 The Justice Secretary Mr Gauke said: “I do not want community orders which are in any sense a ‘soft option’. I want a regime that can impose greater restrictions on people’s movements and lifestyle and stricter requirements in terms of accessing treatment and support. And critically, these sentences must be enforced.

“GPS tagging will help to better protect victims and give them the reassurance that perpetrators will not be able to breach an exclusion zone without triggering an immediate alert.

The scheme is an improvement on the previous ankle tagging scheme which only notified police if offenders left their houses outside of a curfew.
If a tagged domestic abuser or stalker enters a banned area or a gang member is found somewhere they should not be, this new capability will issue an automatic alert and their whereabouts will be known.

The tags also provide a tougher option for community sentences which can be used alongside requirements like alcohol or drug treatment programmes.
Location monitoring will go live in Hertfordshire plus the South West, South East and Wales by April 2019.
 
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Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner hears of initiatives to tackle begging and youth offending in Watford
Initiatives to tackle begging, rough sleeping and youth crime were discussed when Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd visited Watford.
Mr Lloyd last week met with the borough’s Chief Inspector, charity workers and the head teacher of a referral school, to find out what is being done to cut crime and offending.
“I am committed to visiting every one of Hertfordshire’s 10 boroughs or districts at least once a year. It is vital to get out on the streets and talk to people who are dealing with victims and offenders on a daily basis.
David Lloyd in Watford town centre with homeless worker Steve Devine
“Through funding partnerships I have committed money to schemes throughout Watford and it is satisfying to see how those funds are being put to good use.”
At Watford police station the Commissioner received a briefing from Ch Insp Matt Phillips who said: ““We experience a higher level of serious crime than the rest of Hertfordshire as we are a front door into London, being right on the border with good road and rail links.”
“We have seen an increase in the numbers of rough sleepers and associated begging in the town centre. This causes concern to residents and local businesses, we are working with the council and charities to reduce this.”
Operation Guardian which has seen a reduction in dwelling burglary by a 9% on last year.

While high levels of street robbery has led to officers targeting those responsible with a preventative approach before they can offend again.
At the Chessbrook Educational Support Centre, in Tolpits Lane, Mr Lloyd heard students are referred from a mainstream school because of special needs or a record of poor behaviour.
Upon joining each student is given a Personalised Learning Mentor who will support them through all aspects of their educational development and be the first point of contact between the school and the parents.
There are also two new youth crime PCSO’s who work with Chessbrook to identify children of concern or at risk.
They will build on the traditional safer schools partnership model by patrolling parks, cinemas, and the town centre where youngsters congregate.  This adds some policing continuity and knowledge around emerging youth criminality
Head teacher Sue Howe said: “We are the hub – here to support the young people, plus their parents and schools.”
“We work with the parents to break the cycle and keep young people in full-time education. We have two of our students this year that are thinking about applying for university, they would never have dreamed of that before coming here.”
After a walk through the town centre Mr Lloyd was invited to the New Hope Haven, Rough Sleeper Management centre, in Queens Road.
The police have been running Operation Blanket which was been created to break up the homeless groups and beggars so they can stabilize those who are deemed to be the most vulnerable.

The group were show a video, funded by the Commissioner’s Action Fund. Entitled ‘How your spare change can change lives’ it aims to alter the public’s attitudes to beggars by recommending giving to homeless charities instead of individuals.
The centre can offer beds to 31 people with a minimum of two staff available 24 hours a day and offers general advice, referrals to other agencies and local drug and alcohol support.
Chief Executive Matthew Heasman said: “No one has had to sleep on the streets this winter out of choice. We can see the lives we have changed lives. We have helped homeless people back into permanent accommodation and be reunited with families they have not seen in years.”
 
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More officers on the street as funding plan from Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner is unanimously approved
Residents of Hertfordshire will see more police officers on the streets, the Commissioner of Hertfordshire David Lloyd has promised.

Mr Lloyd made the pledge as his funding plan was backed unanimously in a vote by the Hertfordshire Police and Crime panel.

An extra 75 frontline police officers will now be recruited after Mr Lloyd told the panel, meeting at the offices of Hertsmere Borough Council, he proposed a £2 a month rise in the Council Tax Precept.


“The public will see an increase in the number of officers on the street. These new officers will bring the total of front line officers in Hertfordshire to over 2,000.” said Mr Lloyd.

“The public have overwhelmingly told me they are prepared to pay more, but only if they get an increase in police numbers. This is what this budget delivers.

“We hear horror stories from other regions in the UK where residents say ‘the police are not interested in investigating my burglary’. I never want to hear anyone in Hertfordshire say this. We are committed to investigating 100 per cent of all burglaries.”

In December Mr Lloyd asked for the public’s views on his bid to raise an additional £10.7m for policing in Hertfordshire in 2019/20.

Mr Lloyd added: “As a result of good financial management we have not seen the cuts in police officer numbers in Hertfordshire which other areas have suffered. But pressure on the police is growing and this increase gives us the opportunity to invest in more new officers to meet that demand.

“This rise in Council Tax is vital to fulfil my Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan which is committed to putting victims first and supporting them through the criminal justice system.”

The Precept increase of less than 50p a week per average household will help protect neighbourhood policing teams and investment in services for victims.
As outlined in the Open Letter challenges presented this year include increases in reported fraud, cybercrime and the threat of serious violence.

Full details can be viewed in his Open Letter to Hertfordshire.

The government has provided PCCs with the ability to raise the police section of the council tax by an average of £2 per month for a property in Band D.
Raising the precept would generate 10.7 million in income a year, a five percent increase in the total policing budget.

The police precept accounts for around 40% of Hertfordshire Constabulary’s budget. Just under 60% comes from central government grant. For the forthcoming year Hertfordshire Police had been given an additional £4.2m from central government, £2m to cover pension costs and £2.2m for an increase in core funding.
 
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Extra 75 frontline police officers for Hertfordshire
An extra 75 frontline police officers are set to be recruited in Hertfordshire.

The Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd confirmed that he will propose a £2 a month rise in council tax.

He made the decision after a public consultation showed strong support for the move with more than three quarters of respondents back it.
Mr Lloyd’s plan will bring the total of front line officers in Hertfordshire to over 2,000.

Last month Mr Lloyd asked for the public’s views on his bid to raise an additional £10.7m for po
licing in Hertfordshire in 2019/20.

David LLoyd plans to fund the recruitment boost with a rise in the Council Tax precept
David Lloyd said: “I asked the public what they wanted and they have said clearly they are prepared to pay more and want to see more frontline officers as a result.

“I have listened and my proposal to the Crime Panel will ensure that this is what the increase in the precept will deliver.

“As a result of good financial management we have not seen the cuts in police officer numbers in Hertfordshire which other areas have suffered. But pressure on the police is growing and this increase gives us the opportunity to invest in more new officers to meet that demand.


“This rise in Council Tax is vital to fulfil my Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan which is committed to putting victims first and supporting them through the criminal justice system.”


A total of 827 people replied with 77 percent in favour of increasing the police element of the precept.

The proposed increase of less than 50p a week per average household will help protect neighbourhood policing teams and investment in services for victims.

As outlined in the Open Letter challenges presented this year include increases in reported fraud, cybercrime and the threat of serious violence.
A full summary of the public consultation will be available at the Hertfordshire Police and Crime Panel meeting at Hertsmere Borough Council office in Borehamwood on January 31st 2019, where their formal approval of the plan will be sought.


Full details can be viewed in his Open Letter to Hertfordshire.
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Additional two pounds a Month proposed to Invest in Hertfordshire Police
The Police and Crime Commissioner for Hertfordshire wants to hear your views on his proposal for an increase of £2 a month on the average household council tax rate to build on his investment in more officers, bringing the total to over 2000.

Following last week’s announcement by the Home Office, David Lloyd will be able to raise an additional £10.7m for policing in Hertfordshire in 2019/20.

The proposed increase of less than 50p a week per average household will help protect neighbourhood policing teams and investment in services for victims.

David Lloyd said:

“Unlike many police forces that have been cutting back their frontline, I have continued to invest heavily in preserving and strengthening local policing.  It helps to create a police force that is embedded in, and supported by a community working together to cut crime. 

“My Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan focuses on putting victims of crime first and finding ways to improve the support they require and their journey through the criminal justice system. Further investment will be made in improving the service that victims receive and the outcomes for victims engaged with the criminal justice system.”

Full details can be viewed in his open letter to Hertfordshire.

If you would like to send comments, please email them to your.views@herts.pcc.pnn.gov.uk or by letter to: The Police and Crime Commissioner for Hertfordshire, 15 Vaughan Road, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 4GZ by 7th January 2019.
 
Background

The government has provided PCCs with the ability to raise the police section of the council tax by an average of £2 per month.

The police precept accounts for around 40% of Hertfordshire Constabulary’s budget. Just under 60% comes from central government grant which has been frozen for the next year, and the rest is from constabulary reserves.

 
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