Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner.  
Commissioner's Office: 01707 806100
Refreshed Police and Crime Plan published
A refreshed Police and Crime Plan for Hertfordshire has been published by Commissioner David Lloyd.

Mr Lloyd decided to refresh the Plan halfway through its statutory four year cycle to reflect crime type changes and concerns from the members of the public.

Last month Mr Lloyd’s Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan ‘Everybody’s Business’, was signed off by the Hertfordshire Police and Crime Panel.
The core of the plan is centred on four themes: Building on Success, Putting Victims at the Centre, Public Focus and Business Sense.

A full copy of the published report can be found here https://www.hertscommissioner.org/police-and-crime-plan-herts-pcc.
“Keeping people safe, putting victims first and cutting crime remain the priorities but we need to be flexible to raising crime types,” said Mr Lloyd.

“Cyber fraud is highlighted throughout this report as it remains to be a threat to everyone in Hertfordshire. I have committed resources to preventing it and helping those who have fallen victim to it.”

Hertfordshire’s victim service Beacon has been expanded with the addition of a Fraud Hub to help those who lose money in what is the most prevalent crime in the county.

He added: “My plan recognises that keeping Hertfordshire safe is Everybody’s Business, not just a job for the Constabulary. So throughout the plan I have asked for more - of the Police, of all public and private sector partners, voluntary sector, businesses and of the public themselves.

“Keeping people safe, putting victims first and cutting crime remain the priorities but we need to be flexible to raising crime types,” said Mr Lloyd.

“Cyber fraud is highlighted throughout this report as it remains to be a threat to everyone in Hertfordshire. I have committed resources to preventing it and helping those who have fallen victim to it.”

Hertfordshire’s victim service Beacon has been expanded with the addition of a Fraud Hub to help those who lose money in what is the most prevalent crime in the county.

He added: “My plan recognises that keeping Hertfordshire safe is Everybody’s Business, not just a job for the Constabulary. So throughout the plan I have asked for more - of the Police, of all public and private sector partners, voluntary sector, businesses and of the public themselves.


“I have focused on maintaining our strong position as one of the highest performing police forces in the country. We are second in the most similar group of areas for lowest overall recorded crime per 1000 head of population.”

The Plan backs the continuation of the neighbourhood policing model, which is more expensive neighbourhood and only a handful of forces across the country have kept.

“This involves the protection of the current local policing model of ten district teams, led by a senior officer.

Another part of the Plan sets out introducing a new rape scrutiny panel which will examine which cases are sent to court and those that are not.

“I am really concerned that when people find out the real low levels of conviction of rape, that they will be put off reporting incidents. It is something I am very passionate about and I want to see action taken.”

With rape prosecution levels remaining low across the country, the new Panel is proposed to introduce more transparency and scrutiny into the system.

The panel will look at rape case files where it has been judged that no crime has been committed, or which were said not to have achieved the required threshold of evidence to be sent to the Crown Prosecution Service.

This will provide an insight into the effectiveness of the police investigation and identify lessons-learned for the future management and investigation of cases.

Other new proposals in the report include new mobile speed detection vans and the creation of and a crackdown on lorries driving through villages.



“A number of residents have raised concerns regarding the volume of lorries that are travelling through their villages that ignore signage around weight restrictions,” he said.

A pilot scheme is to monitor lorries and heavy goods vehicles in residential areas which misuse weight restricted routes and frequently exceed the maximum load (7.5 tonnes).

An increase in the Council Tax precept in January is already paying for an additional 75 officers this year, with the number already over 2,000 for the first time since 2011.

A printed copy of the report is available by emailing commissioner@pcc.pnn.gov.uk or calling the office on 01707 806 100.