Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner.  
Commissioner's Office: 01707 806100
Police and Crime Commissioner responds to Corona virus measures
Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd is calling on the public to support the police during the lockdown.

He is assuring residents that the constabulary remains fully operational and prepared, the police have his backing to use their new powers if needed.

Members of the public are being urged to follow the Government advice and stay at home to save lives and ease pressure on the emergency services.

Mr Lloyd said: “These are powers that nobody wanted to take on but the situation is grave and they are necessary to ensure that people are kept safe and that as few people as possible die.




“It is vital that we all heed the government advice and warnings and ensure that the police never have to use their new powers in Hertfordshire – our policing is with the consent of the people.

“I intend to ensure that remains the case, and that we are doing what the public would want us to do.
“If the public do not comply with this lockdown the police will use their powers to enforce it, and have my full support in that. 

“The Chief Constable has assured me that the force is fully operational and well prepared.


“Our officers and staff are working flat out every day to keep us safe and it is our duty to support them and make their job easier by reducing unnecessary pressures on them.

“I have always said policing is everybody’s business and that is also true of the threat we face to today.

“It is only by working together as a community, acting responsibly and being ready to offer help where it is needed that we will overcome this crisis.”

Hertfordshire Chief Constable Charlie Hall said: “This is a public health emergency and compliance with these measures are considered necessary to achieve the objective of effective social distancing.

“We have all heard the scientific advice which clearly states this will slow the spread of the virus and save people’s lives.

“The Constabulary urges self-compliance within all Hertfordshire’s communities. Officers and staff will encourage all citizens to do so, remind those who we see in public who we believe may not be following them to do so, and only resort to enforcement action as a last resort.

“If we all work at this together we will slow the spread, save more lives and enable us to return to normality sooner.”

Please follow the Commissioner’s and Constabulary’s social media for updates and use the website www.herts.police.uk to contact the police rather than dialling 101, and only call 999 in an emergency.
 
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Commissioner reassures public that core policing will be maintained
Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd has told residents and business to remain calm during the Corona virus.

Following a full briefing with the Chief Constable Charlie Hall he wants to reassure the public that the police are still undertaking their core roles of investigating, arresting offenders and responding to 999 and 101 calls.

He wants to reassure that an event such as this has been planned for in advance and measures are in place to ensure staffing levels are protected. 


Mr Lloyd with Chief Constable Charlie Hall

Mr Lloyd said: “I have met with the Chief Constable and I am speaking to him on a daily basis about how Hertfordshire Constabulary are meeting the challenges of the COVID-19 virus.

“I am satisfied that there are extensive and detailed plans to ensure a resilient response to the current and future demands. Measures have been put in place to minimize the number of staff affected by the virus and maintain front line policing.

“Officers are still undertaking their core roles of investigating crime, arresting offenders and responding to emergency and non-emergency calls.

“This is a time for calm and thoughtful actions. The public can be assured that the police, other emergency services, plus local and national governments and agencies have planned for events such as these.”
 
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Specialist fraud hub recovers £300,000 for victims
A specialist scheme to support every victim of fraud in Hertfordshire has recovered £300,000 in the first six months.

The Beacon Fraud Hub was set up by Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd in response to the most common crime in the county.

The unit, based at the victim care centre, in Welwyn Garden City, has four members of staff with specialist knowledge who contact all those in the county who have reported having money fraudulently taken.

In the first six months since its creation in April 2019 the team have got almost a third of a million pounds back for victims.



The sums recovered range from £75 to £50,000 and have been obtained by helping victims reminding banks of their obligations under the banking protocol code.

Mr Lloyd said: “I am pleased to see that the new Fraud Hub is already bringing tangible benefits to many victims across the county.

“The team have been working with victims on a one-to-one level to advocate and advise them on how to reclaim money from their banks if they have been the victims of fraud.

“Their help includes assisting on writing letters, even accompanying vulnerable victims, to banks to speak to staff on their behalf.

“I would like to thank the Beacon staff for all their hard work. This is one of the reasons I recently approved plans to run the Fraud Hub pilot for a second year.”


   Mr Lloyd at Beacon

News of the success comes during in the Year of Beacon – which in 2020 is marking the fifth anniversary of the creation of Hertfordshire’s victim care service centre.

The Fraud Hub is the first enhanced scheme of its kind in England and Wales and was recently hailed at the College of Policing fraud conference as the ‘gold standard’ for victims of this crime type.

One resident whose family business was close to collapse after a conman stole £23,000 got her money back thanks to Beacon.


   Fraud victim Karen Oak who got £23,000 back with Beacon advisor Elaine Crate

Karen Oak, from Stevenage, got all her lost money reimbursed by her bank after advice from one of the advisors on how to contact her bank and what regulations to rely on.

In the first six months alone since its creation its advisers have directly helped more than 3,500 victims.

The criminal investigation of the crime is led by the City of London Police through Action Fraud, which handle all fraud cases nationally.

Every week a list of around 650 Hertfordshire fraud victims who have initially reported to the Action Fraud are sent to Beacon.

The Fraud Hub use technical knowledge to help develop an action plan for victims which includes liaising with agencies on their behalf; conducting a needs assessment; providing practical support and measures for target hardening.

Though not set-up to investigate the crime or recover lost funds, there are several examples where Beacon has been able to retrieve the money stolen from the victims through effective advocacy with financial institutions.

The Beacon Fraud Hub is now an integral part of the County Fraud Strategy and where substantive links have been made with Citizens Advice and Age UK.

The £128,000 pilot covered the salaries and other expenses of the four new staff recruited and was funded by a Ministry of Justice victim commissioning grant.

Background:

Beacon - The Beacon team will contact all victims of crime and, where appropriate, work with specialist case managers to provide a complete wrap-around service to help victims to cope and recover. The team has direct access to Hertfordshire Partnership Foundation Trust Single Point of Access team (Mental Health services), Hertfordshire County Council Social Care Access Team and Hertfordshire Home Security Service to ensure that they can provide assistance quickly and seamlessly. 

Hertfordshire Beacon is staffed by Victim Service Team each day 8am – 8pm, in addition, Catch22 employees work Monday to Friday 8am – 8pm & Saturday 9am – 5pm. By phone: 0300 011 55 55 by email beacconvictimcare@herts.pnn.police.uk or info@hertfordshirebeacon.org
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Have your say on how to improve sexual violence support services in Hertfordshire
Victims and professionals are being asked for their experiences and ideas in a bid to improve sexual violence support services in Hertfordshire.

The Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner is working with NHS England to review how those affected by sexual assault and abuse and their families, could be best supported.

Currently the two organisations along with Hertfordshire Constabulary, fund and support Herts SARC (Sexual Abuse Referral Centre) in Hemel Hempstead which provides forensic medical examinations as well as supporting victims of sexual crimes emotionally, practically and through the criminal justice system.
An Independent Sexual Violence Adviser (ISVA) will be assigned to a victim to support them through a risk assessment, organising counselling and any court processes if appropriate. They also confidentially support victims who self-refer and who do not wish to report the abuse as a crime.

Now in a bid to make sure that the best service is being offered the Police and Crime Commissioner’s office has launched a consultation to explore how the service can be improved.

Victims, families and those who work with those effected by sexual violence are being asked to share their ideas and take a survey. It aims to find out what matters most to individuals in Hertfordshire and build future services around the priorities and needs.

Through a dedicated website at hertfordshiresexualabuseconsultation.com you are encouraged to share your stories.

Partners, colleagues and professionals are being asked to give their ideas on what changes are needed, including fresh ideas.

The Commissioner’s office would like your help to understand what more these services can do to be supportive and accessible to those in need.
NHS England have set out a long term strategic direction for sexual assault and abuse services to provide longer term and more holistic care for victims and survivors. While the PCC agrees with the ambitions in this national strategy the office would like to know what matters most to individuals in Hertfordshire and build our future services around your priorities and needs.

The consultations will run from the 1st March 2020 – 16th May 2020.

We understand that some of the topics discussed here may be of a sensitive, upsetting or distressing nature.

If you have been affected and would like to find out about the support that is available in Hertfordshire for victims of crime please follow the links below:
Hertfordshire Sexual Assault Referral Centre
Beacon, Hertfordshire Victim Care Centre
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Projects to tackle serious youth violence and domestic abuse reviewed
Projects to turn youngsters away from violent crime and for domestic abusers to seek help have been reviewed by the Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner.

David Lloyd met with those running programmes he has funded during a district day visit to Three Rivers last week.

A key part of Mr Lloyd’s Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan is to reduce the level of crime, and fear of crime, in Hertfordshire by preventing offences from occurring.


   Mr Lloyd with Parnerships Manager Shivani Dave and Jackquie Joyce                 Listening to local officer Sgt Dan Amos

On Friday at the Otley Family Centre, South Oxhey, he heard from neighbourhood police officers, council staff and charity workers about local issues and what is being done to tackle them.

The Domestic Abuse Prevention Pilot was partly paid for with a £18,986 award from the PCC’s Criminal Justice Innovation Fund to recruit for caseworker Jacqui Joyce.

She works with perpetrators of abuse who are looking to change their behaviour and provide them with support.

“Since we began in June 2019 we have had 18 referrals, 15 male and 3 female, of which 13 engaged and two have now been discharged,” said Jacqui.

“It is a voluntary scheme to break the cycle of abuse and change the behaviours they are involved in. Several of the clients have complex and severe mental health issues, which I assist in getting them get help for.

“The pilot is working very well and has led to a reduction in domestic abuse.”

The South West Herts Youth Action Panel fed back on how they have been working with a St Giles Trust SOS project worker, who is one of several across the county part funded by a £140,000 Community Safety Grant.


  Hearing about the work done by the Prolific and Priority Offendender Team

Working across Watford, Hertsmere and Three Rivers the worker is engaging and mentoring one-on-one with over 20 young people who are at risk of committing serious violence.

Mr Lloyd said: “Less criminality leads to a better community. Prevention of a crime is a much better than outcome, than it occurring and then having the offender arrested and taken through the criminal justice system.

“There is often a high correlation between victims and perpetrators, so if we can get in early and change behaviours it will ultimately lead to safer environment for all.

“Funding schemes such as those I have seen today, is a key responsibility of my role to prevent crime as it is to ensure and efficient and effective police service.”

Mr Lloyd also heard about the work of the PPO (Prolific and Priority Offender) team which includes local police officers, the council and housing associations collaborating to manage serial offenders.
 
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Gold standard specialist victim fraud hub set to be extended
A ‘gold standard’ scheme to support every victim of fraud in Hertfordshire is set to be extended.

Following a successful pilot, of the first enhanced scheme of its kind in England and Wales, there are plans to run the Beacon Fraud Hub for a second year.

Created by the Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd, the scheme was recently hailed at the College of Policing fraud conference as the ‘gold standard’ for victims of this crime type in England and Wales.

The unit has four members of staff with specialist knowledge who contact all those in the county who have reported having money fraudulently taken.

In the first six months alone since its creation in April last year its advisers have directly helped more than 3,500 victims.

Its extension marks one of the first milestones in the Year of Beacon – which in 2020 is marking the fifth anniversary of the creation of Hertfordshire’s victim care service centre.

Now Mr Lloyd has approved proposals to explore making the Fraud Hub a run for a second year in Beacon.



Mr Lloyd said: “As fraud is the crime that you are most likely to fall victim to in Hertfordshire, I wanted to make sure we are doing everything possible to prevent people becoming repeat victims and give them the upmost support.

“Everyone has experience of being contacted by phone or email by someone trying to scam them out of money.  Sadly it is often the elderly and most vulnerable that hand over money to these very convincing and sophisticated criminals.

“That is why I introduced this pilot and now that it has proved it can make a real difference to victims the plan is to keep offering it as part of the services provided by Beacon.

“We are now looking to open out referrals to those beyond those who have reported to Action Fraud, starting with referrals from front line practitioners involved in welfare and social care.”

Every week a list of around 650 Hertfordshire fraud victims who have initially reported to the Action Fraud, the designated national police organisation, are sent to Beacon.



The Fraud Hub use technical knowledge to help develop an action plan for victims which includes liaising with agencies on their behalf; conducting a needs assessment; providing practical support and measures for target hardening.

Though not set-up to investigate the crime or recover lost funds, there are several examples where Beacon has been able to retrieve the money stolen from the victims through effective advocacy with financial institutions.

One resident whose family business was close to collapse after a conman stole £23,000 got her money back thanks to new anti-fraud team.

Karen Oak, from Stevenage, got all her lost money reimbursed by her bank after advice from one of the advisors on how to contact her bank and what regulations to rely on.

The Beacon Fraud Hub is now an integral part of the County Fraud Strategy and where substantive links have been made with Citizens Advice and Age UK.

The £128,000 pilot covered the salaries and other expenses of the four new staff recruited and was funded by a government Ministry of Justice victim commissioning grant.
 
Background:
The Beacon Fraud Hub involves the Victim Service Team (VST) making proactive calls to victims list and Catch 22 Fraud Advisors delivering a technically competent and supportive role by offering a complete package of support for those most in need.
VST undertake an initial needs assessment with onward referral to Catch 22 Case Managers where the victim has indicated they require tailored support.

In the six months from 1 Apr to 30 Sep 2019 the VST received details of 3,727 crimes, this consisted of 469 reports from businesses and 3,258 from Hertfordshire individuals.

The VST attempted to contact by telephone 2,999 individuals (80% of all reports). The model allows for all businesses to receive a letter.

The support provided by Catch 22 includes: providing emotional and / or practical support, security advice and advocacy on the victim’s behalf, information provision, liaising with the police, and referrals onto third party agencies for specialist support.

Beacon - The Beacon team will contact all victims of crime and, where appropriate, work with specialist case managers to provide a complete wrap-around service to help victims to cope and recover.

The team has direct access to Hertfordshire Partnership Foundation Trust Single Point of Access team (Mental Health services), Hertfordshire County Council Social Care Access Team and Hertfordshire Home Security Service to ensure that they can provide assistance quickly and seamlessly. 

Hertfordshire Beacon is staffed by Victim Service Team each day 8am – 8pm, in addition, Catch22 employees work Monday to Friday 8am – 8pm & Saturday 9am – 5pm. By phone: 0300 011 55 55 by email beacconvictimcare@herts.pnn.police.uk or info@hertfordshirebeacon.org
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Stop and Search Scrutiny volunteers wanted
People interested in reviewing how the Hertfordshire Police use their stop and search powers are being asked to volunteer.

The Police and Crime Commissioner’s Office is recruiting people from all backgrounds who live or work in Hertfordshire and who want to make a positive contribution to the process of Stop and Search scrutiny.

New members to the panel aged between 18-30 are particularly wanted.

The Scrutiny Panel meets six times a year for between two to three hours to discuss, monitor and examine how Hertfordshire Constabulary are carrying out Stop and Search.

Training will be provided and members will be subject to vetting procedures. Members take part in the dip sampling of the Stop Search forms in order to achieve greater transparency in the use of the powers and improve public confidence and trust in how the tactic is used.



They also analyse body worn footage of stop searches and review anonymised records.

Those volunteering for the scheme will play a role in public scrutiny, holding the police to account for the behaviour and develop transferrable skills.
 For further information and an application form, please visit the Commissioner’s website: https://www.hertscommissioner.org/stopsearch

Applications are now open and the closing date is March 31st 2020. They can be submitted by email to pccadmin@herts.pcc.pnn.gov.uk or sent by post to the following address: Police and Crime Commissioner for Hertfordshire, Harpenden Police Station, 15 Vaughan Road, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 4GZ.

Interviews will take place the following month. Half day training will be provided subject to successful vetting clearance.

The panel was set up by the Commissioner in 2015 as part of meeting the requirement of the government’s 2014 Best Use of Stop and Search Scheme that aims to improve trust and confidence in the police. 
 
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Latest round of bids for Community Safety Grant Fund launched
Bids are being invited by the Hertfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd for new projects and ideas aimed at keeping communities safe.

The Community Safety Grant Fund 2020/21 has now been launched and is open for two months until Friday 17th April.

Every year Mr Lloyd oversees the scheme which supports work with partner organisations who have a vital part to play in keeping Hertfordshire’s communities safe.

Grant recipients need to make sure their activities focus on the needs of the public, particularly victims of crime, ensuring that offenders make amends and pay back for the cost of crime.

Applicants are asked to consider how their proposed projects align with the aims of the Community Safety and Criminal Justice Plan, as well as with local priorities.


  The Fearless project was funded by the Commissioner last year to help young people

In delivering against the Plan, the Commissioner envisages that these grants will contribute towards securing crime and disorder reduction in Hertfordshire.

Last year the multiagency Fearless project was supported to educate young people about Child Exploitation and grooming, with a focus of working with Hertsmere schools. They held a Fearless conference and an Outreach Worker started to engage with pupils and parents across the county.

Last year also saw £260,000 of funding awarded to help the thousands of residents being targeted by scammers.

The grant for the Herts Scams Support and Prevention Project is being run by Citizens Advice Hertfordshire over two years at a cost of £130,000 a year.

Funding is being used to employ three full-time scam advisors who will train 600 volunteers and other workers across the county to focus on fraud prevention and repeat victimisation.

Another scheme also saw Mr Lloyd approving a £140,000 Community Safety Grant for a major new initiative to tackle knife and serious violent crime across the county.


   Another project to help residents avoid fraud has also been funded  

It saw the recruitment of additional SOS St Giles’ Trust youth project workers across the county to focus on early intervention and targeted help for young people at risk. It is now safeguarding hundreds of children and young young adults in Hertfordshire who are at risk of being drawn into gang activity and other serious offending.

Details on how to apply, as well as how previous years’ funds were allocated, can be found on the Commissioner’s website https://www.hertscommissioner.org/community-safety-fund.
 
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Ware set to get a new police station within a year
Plans for Ware to get a new police station within a year were raised during a visit to East Herts by the Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd.

A suitable site in the town centre has been identified and discussions regarding the lease and alterations of the existing proposed building are already underway.

During the visit Mr Lloyd also visited a training event for professionals to spot the signs of domestic abuse. He also went to Freman College, in Buntingford, to hear the crime concerns and ideas of pupils.

Mr Lloyd said: “I am pleased to see plans have been progressing to get a police station back in Ware. I am aware it is something the residents and Chief Inspector have been asking for, as has the local MP Julie Marson.


   Mr Lloyd  with Ch Insp Orton                                                                                            Ch Inspector Orton and Pc Gemma Wardell at Freman College                                                                              

“The police have been putting in a lot of work to find the right location and now that has been found a final proposal is being worked on to make it a reality. If all goes well I look forward to opening it within a year.

“Today I also got to witness the important work being carried out by the Herts Sunflower domestic abuse initiative.

“The Chief Inspector and I are aware of a rise in incidents in Buntingford, he has assured me measures are being put in place to address the issues.”

East Herts Area Commander Chief Inspector Stuart Orton said: “Getting a police station back in Ware will help us be more visible and give residents greater confidence.

“I wanted to come to the school in Buntingford today for a Community Voice event, to reassure people that we do listen to what you are telling us. It is an essential part of how the area is policed.

“Community Voice events provide a face to face opportunity for people to tell the police what issues matter to them, which helps officers to understand what would make them feel safer.”

There has not been a dedicated station in Ware for several years and plans for sharing space a Ware Fire Station were ruled out because of a lack of space.


   Domestic violence training event at East Herts                                                Addressing pupils at Freman College

Once the final costings for moving into the new premises been agreed the final decision will then be put forward to Mr Lloyd to approve opening the new base.

After meeting East Herts Council leaders, Mr Lloyd dropped in to a training exercise run by Kim Scott, from Saferplaces, a domestic violence charity, as part of the Sunflower J9 project.

The attendees were professionals from around the district, including housing, schools, NHS and social care, to enable them to be the lead member in their organisation in tackling domestic abuse.

The day ended when Mr Lloyd accompanied Ch Insp Orton and neighbourhood officer PC Gemma Wardell at a community voice event at Freman College, in Bowling Green Lane, Buntingford.

They discussed with the students what their thoughts of local officers were, what the police could do to make them feel safer and if they had any concerns about crime in the town.


   Kim Scott from Safeplaces

The constabulary launched echo, a community voice platform that allows residents and local businesses to use their own language and at any time to tell the police what they think they should be focussing on.

“Echo provides a great opportunity to have your voice heard and to influence the priorities for policing where you live. I Ware we have created a dedicated platform where you can share your views anonymously at http://bit.ly/police-ware.

“The more feedback, views and opinions we receive via echo, the better we can understand what matters most to you, and where we should be investing out time and resources,” added Ch Insp Orton.
 
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Year of Beacon launched as 250,000 people supported by Herts victim care centre
A ‘Year of Beacon’ has been launched to celebrate Hertfordshire’s victim care service centre supporting over 250,000 people.

As 2020 marks the fifth anniversary since the creation of the organisation a series of events will celebrate the work it undertakes.

Since it was created by Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd in April 2015 Beacon has contacted 6,000 victims of crime a month to offer information, support and assistance.

Those helped have ranged from age four to 97 and includes people who have not reported crimes to police.

Based at Hertfordshire Police headquarters in Welwyn Garden City, Beacon was established as a ground-breaking hybrid model.


Mr Lloyd at Beacon at Police HQ

Supporting victims of crime is a legal police responsibility, which in most parts of the country is either run by a police officer team or outsourced to an external charity.

But Mr Lloyd decided a more comprehensive hybrid system would best serve victims and he created the Beacon victim service centre.

It is staffed by 16 police officers and staff, including three sergeants in the Victim Service Team who contact every person in the county who have reported an offence.

Those effected by high harm crimes, are vulnerable or require additional support are then referred to one of 15 professional case managers from the charity Catch 22.

Mr Lloyd said: “Beacon is a flagship victim service centre. Here in Hertfordshire we have one of the largest teams of victims service professionals all sat in in one room, in the country.


A picture drawn by one of Beacon's youngest clients.

“Beacon represents an annual investment of £1m which is purely dedicated to provide support for everything from antisocial behaviour to those affected by serious sexual assaults and murder.

“Historically victims support was often run by volunteers but our model is staffed by professionals working to a service delivery programme that has provided evidence of positives outcomes.

“It is light years away from the traditional idea that victims are only offered sympathy with a cup of tea and slice of cake.

“Our case workers advocating on their clients behalf, for example going along to their banks with them if they have been victims of fraud. Very few victim services in England and Wales provide that level of support.

“The professionalism of the unit has been raised, as they are all in the same office it works seamlessly with the constabulary. The workers have access to the investigation to provide updates to the victims.”


Mr Lloyd meeting HRH Princess Anne, the patron of Catch-22 who help run Beacon.

The service is funded by an annual £1.5m grant from Ministry of Justice, which comes from the Victims Surcharge imposed following fines and court cases. One of the roles of Police and Crime Commissioners is to use it to organise and provide provision for victims.

Since it was created Beacon has contacted to 291,000 residents. Those in need are provided with a case worker who draws up a support plan. This includes safety planning, preventing re-victimisation, plus financially and medical assistance.

They can arrange for target hardening using the Herts Home Safety Service to prevent re-victimisation.

The average case worker works with a client for three months. By the end of the process 87 per cent of victims feel safer and more informed.

One of their youngest clients was a little boy who had witnessed abusive behaviour. He drew a ‘sad volcano’ as he felt he ‘was going to explode’. Following intervention from the Beacon team the situation was resolved and he then described himself as a ‘happy volcano’.


Beacon is staffed by Victim Service Team each day 8am – 8pm, in addition, Catch22 employees work Monday to Friday 8am – 8pm & Saturday 9am – 5pm. By phone: 0300 011 55 55 by email beacconvictimcare@herts.pnn.police.uk or info@hertfordshirebeacon.org

Their website is http://www.hertfordshirebeacon.org/
 
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Herts largest ever police force plans supported by ten pound tax increase
Residents in Hertfordshire are to pay an average of £10-a-year extra to support plans for the county’s largest ever police force.

Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd’s proposal to increase the Council Tax police precept as part of the boost were unanimously agreed last week.

Mr Lloyd’s decision follows a public consultation in which 65 percent of residents said they wanted to pay more to support extra policing in the county.

Hertfordshire is on course to have 2,100 officers by the end of the forthcoming financial year, the highest level in a decade. Numbers are then set to increase to 2,314 officers, the highest number ever, by the end of March 2023.


   Commissioner David Lloyd with Chief Constable Charlie Hall

Mr Lloyd said: “This is a transformational budget for policing – in simple terms there will be more officers on the streets of Hertfordshire.

“I represent the people of Hertfordshire, and when the people were asked if they supported an increase in the precept for this aim, they overwhelmingly gave their support.”

“It is a collective investment from local tax payers and central government towards giving Hertfordshire the largest constabulary we have ever had.

“Unlike other parts of the country the boost in officers is not just replacing officers who were lost in recent cuts, as in Hertfordshire, even during the austerity times, police officers were maintained at broadly the same level.

“Now we are going to have a substantially larger force and it is vital that it is properly resourced. It is appropriate that local tax payers make a contribution to this investment.

“The increase of the precept by £10-a-year for the average Council Tax payer, will support the hundreds of extra officers for years to come; at £198 per annum this still represents excellent value.


   New police recruits with the Commissioner and Police Chief

“They need to be provided with the very best equipment, training and facilities and to enable them to protect the public and keep crime low.”

An extra £16m will be invested in Hertfordshire Police this year, with the precept increase generating £5.8m, and uplifted core government grants providing an extra £10.7m.
 
The proposed £217m net budget was agreed at the Police and Crime Panel last Thursday evening at Broxbourne Borough Council office.
 
The precept pays for 42% of Hertfordshire Constabulary’s 20/21 budget, generating £90.5.m. The other 58%, £126.8m, comes from central government grants.
 
Band D property owners will now pay £198 a year, which equates to 83p per month more than the last year.
 
Despite this increase Hertfordshire remains the fourth lowest precepting authority for policing in England and Wales, being 15.4 percent (£31) below the national average.

Also outlined in the budget is a new scheme to tackle the causes of crime and reduce people’s chances of becoming victims. The £1m Crime Prevention and Innovation Fund will look at a broad scope of ways to prevent crime and intervene early.


Mr Lloyd congraulating new officers joining Hertfordshire

“While arresting criminals is important, preventing crime in the first place is better still, and produces a society with less crime and fewer victims,” added Mr Lloyd.

“The government has brought in a new complaints regime to provide a better service to the public. It creates an additional role for PCCs and imposes new duties on them. Our Intention is to build on the excellent foundation our current Complaints Resolution Team have set to develop the new service.”

“This funding will also be used to build on the success of the Beacon Fraud hub to look at how its ‘gold standard’ pilot can be expanded to help victims of this crime type. It’s the first of its kind in providing support and advice to victims of fraud, and in the first six months of operation has already supported well over 3,000 victims.”

Earlier this year a survey conducted by the Commissioner’s office had over 1,000 replies with 65 per cent saying they were willing to pay more for policing.

Hertfordshire Police officer numbers for the past 20 years -
2000: 1,961
2001: 1,992
2002: 1,825
2003: 1,977
2004: 2,177
2005: 2,145
2006: 2,166
2007: 2,202
2008: 2,162
2009: 2,172
2010: 2,130
2011: 2,048
2012: 1,984
2013: 1,953
2014: 1,927
2015: 1,911
2016: 1,929
2017: 1,952
2018: 1,959
Planned:
2019/20: 2,040
2020/21: 2,100
2021/22: 2,222
2022/23: 2,314
 
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Hemel police station reopens after a multi-million modernisation
Hemel Hempstead police station has officially reopened after a £2.5m modernisation to make it fit for purpose for the next 50 years.

The building work and internal refit was completed in November, and this week (Monday) the premises in Coombe Street was formally reopened.

Guest of honour the Lord-Lieutenant of Hertfordshire unveiled a plaque in front of guests including Police and Crime Commissioner David Lloyd, Chief Constable Charlie Hall, the High Sheriff of Hertfordshire and Sir Mike Penning MP.

Mr Lloyd said:  “This renovation of the building that has greatly improved working conditions and facilities for the officers and staff.

“As the number of frontline police officers continues to grow in Hertfordshire it is important we invest in the proper buildings and equipment for them. It is also a more welcoming place for visiting members of public.

“Residents in Hemel Hempstead told me they wanted to keep an operational police station in the centre of the town. This investment has guaranteed it will remain for many more years.

“It’s next door to the council offices which enables close partnership working, which I believe is crucial for reducing crime and keeping people safe.”
Chief Constable Charlie Hall said: “Hemel Hempstead police station provides an essential base for Dacorum’s intervention, Safer Neighbourhood and Local Crime Unit teams, which are led by a Chief Inspector, a Detective Inspector and a Neighbourhood Inspector.

“It is wonderful to witness the culmination of the site’s extensive redevelopment which has given it a new lease of life. Retaining Dacorum’s fully-operational policing base, which has been on this site in Combe Street since 1958, was vitally important for both us and the community.

“I am pleased to say that the completion of this project will allow us to continue working with our partners to serve the borough for years to come.”

Lord-Lieutenant Robert Voss said: “It is an honour to be asked to open this refurbished police station. This excellent working environment is a shining example of the important role that the modern police have in the local community and throughout Hertfordshire.”

Mr Lloyd agreed funding for the project in 2017 to make the station the strategic policing base for Dacorum.

Extensive renovation of the 60 year old building was required as much of the space and services were no longer fit for purpose.

The building was in need of extensive work including a new roof, façade, windows, heating and electrical systems. New internal offices, public spaces and interview rooms have also been created or given extensive renovation.


There is also a video room where officers can give evidence in court cases remotely, and a CCTV viewing room which is used for investigations.

While the year-long project was underway the station remained fully operational from temporary cabins over two floors on the site.
 
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